Question: What percentage of Gen Zers shop online on a daily or weekly basis?


Digital window shopping or in-store strolls? It is a close race between screens and aisles for Gen Z’s shopping habits.

 

Answer: 37%


Questions:

  • Do you prefer in-store or online shopping? Why?
  • How does Gen Z compare to other generations’ shopping habits? Why do you think there are differences among generations?
  • How can shopping online help or hurt one’s ability to stick to their monthly budget?

Click here for the ready-to-go slides for this Question of the Day that you can use with your students. 

 

Behind the numbers (Tidio):

“It’s quite logical that different generations have different shopping habits, both online and offline. However, there are some interesting traits unique to every generation and their spending patterns online.

According to our research, about 45% of Gen Z customers cross-reference prices in multiple online outlets to find the best deal. Gen X and Baby Boomers are less likely to browse multiple online stores than younger generations. It can be linked to the fact that they have more disposable income and can afford to make purchases without hunting for bargains.

Social commerce, being the integration of e-commerce and social media, is expected to grow exponentially in the coming years. In 2022, it generated around $724 billion, which is predicted to increase to $1,238 billion by 2024.”

 

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Choosing a shopping option is just one example of a consumer skill we need to develop in our students. Your students can develop more skills with NGPF’s Consumer Skills unit. 

About
the Author

Mason Butts

After graduating from UCLA with a Master’s in Education, Mason spent 5 years as a science educator in a South Los Angeles public high school. He is committed to supporting the holistic growth of all students and empowering them to live a life of relational, academic, and financial success. Now settled in the Bay Area, Mason enjoys facilitating professional developments and partnering with educators as they prepare students for a bright financial future. When Mason is not building curriculum or planning a training, he can be found cycling, trying new foods, and exploring the outdoors.

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